Official VCDHelp.com PAL/NTSC Demo VCD Tests

page last updated: 27-Dec-2002 | current disc version: 1.0.1 | BUY NOW! | return

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Video-CD tests

PBC Function Tests

8 cm cd-r and vcd2.0 | pbc compatibility | entrypoint <selection> chapters | entrypoint <playlist> chapters | <bsn> value greater than 1 | multi-playitem <playlist> | <playtime> settings | <autowait> settings | random function | <loop> jump timing = immediate | <loop> jump timing = delayed | default button | multi-default menus | audio only spi

8 cm CD-R and VCD2.0 compatible critical.jpg (4251 bytes) Importance: critical
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
The player must be able to play back 8 cm discs to be able to read the PAL/NTSC Demo VCD.  If you look carefully at all tray type CD and DVD drives, you will notice a central depression that fits an 8 cm disc.

The player must also be CD-R compatible.  This is of prime importance if you want the player to be able to read your home-made discs (be they VCDs or audio-CDs).   Not all DVD drives are designed to read CD-R or CD-RW discs and you should assume that they are not if it isn't an explicitly declared ability.

The player must also be VCD2.0 compatible.   This level of compatibility is required to play back menus as well as other forms of user interaction.  If you want to make VCDs, VCD2.0 compatibility is essential.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that when you put the disc in the player, it recognises it as a VCD and starts playing the disc

Fail: this means that when you put the disc in the player, it does not recognise it as a valid disc (e.g., if a player cannot read CD-R discs it will say "No Disc" or "Disc Error") or the player is only capable of VCD1.1.  Note: for many DVD players, once you put the VCD in the player and it has been recognised as a VCD, you need to press "PLAY" before it will begin to play.

PBC (playback control) compatible critical.jpg (4251 bytes) Importance: critical
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
PBC or playback control is used by the player to interpret and play back high resolution still images, menus, chapters, and other forms of user interactivity.  If you want to make and play back VCDs with this additional content, the player must be "PBC compatible".

Many DVD players only start PBC interpretation after you insert a VCD if you press "PLAY".   If you press a number, it will begin playback in a "PBC-less" mode where it plays each video track sequentially from the beginning to the end of the disc.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that the player was able to start playing the disc and show the menus

Fail: this means that when the player starts playing the disc, it does not enter the menu.  Rather, you immediately see the warning message that you have to turn on PBC.  As noted before, you often need to press "PLAY" once you've inserted the disc before it will start PBC interpretation.  Also check your manual on the menu options.  PBC may have been turned off and you may need to reactivate it via some sort of onscreen display menu.   The player truly fails this test if there is no way to turn on PBC.

Entrypoint <selection> chapters critical.jpg (4251 bytes) Importance: critical
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
This is the most common method of authoring chapters on a Video-CD.
interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that the player can interpret entrypoints and use them correctly.  You can author chapters on a VCD and have them play on this player.

Fail: this means that the player does not understand or does not correctly interpret entrypoints.  This is a severe limitation of the player!

Entrypoint <playlist> chapters low.jpg (4332 bytes) Importance: low
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
This is the "real" (i.e., in the (S)VCD specifications) way of authoring chapters on a VCD and if it worked, would give DVD like chapters.  Unfortunately, extremely few players actually support this making it almost useless.

If you author a VCD with the intention of widespread compatibility, then it is advised that you do not author your chapters in the manner.  Rather, use the more limited, but near universal in its compatibility "entrypoint <selection> method".

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that your player can correctly play chapters authored with this method.  Quite amazing!  Very few players support this -- some Philips models.

Fail: the vast majority of players fall into this category so don't be too upset if the player fails this test!

<bsn> value greater than 1 critical.jpg (4251 bytes) Importance: critical
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
<bsn> stands for "base select number" (a VCDImager specific term).

In essence, it is the numerical value of the first choice on a menu.  For example, if on a menu choices can be selected by pressing the numbers (1), (2) and (3), then the <bsn> would equal 1.

Similarly, if on a menu choices can be selected by pressing the numbers (5), (6) and (7), then the <bsn> would equal 5.

This may at first seem to be only a curiosity, but it is actually very very useful.  For example, on "scene selection" menus, the first screen may have choices for the first 4 chapters of the movie.  However, the second screen with have the next 4 chapters -- i.e., chapters 5 to 8.  The logical way of making theses choices will be for the user to enter (5) for chapter 5, (6) for chapter 6 and so on.  Hence, on that menu, the first choice is selected by the number "5" and a <bsn> of 5 would be required.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that your player can correctly interpret the <bsn> value.  Most players can.

Fail: this means that your player does not correctly interpret the <bsn> value!  This is a critical limitation and doubly important as many authored VCDs use this function.  It has been reported that some Apex players support <bsn> erratically.

Multi-playitem <playlist> moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
A <playlist> is used to play video clips and the <play-item> in the playlist is used to reference the media file (VCDImager specific terms).  A playlist can have multiple play-items and it should then play each play-item sequentially.
interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that your player understands that there can be more than 1 play-item and plays them sequentially correctly.

Fail: this means that your player doesn't understand this function.  This is relatively common.  On these players, they only plays the first play-item in the playlist and ignores the rest.  This is not so good.  Fortunately, most people only author playlists with ONE play-item so this isn't a great issue.

To get around this problem (if you have such a player or you want to improve the compatibility of your VCDs so that they will play properly in such a player), you should only use one play-item per playlist.  If you have several video clips that you want to play in sequence, then you can "chain" together a number of playlists).

<playtime> settings moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
<playtime> is an option that can be set in a <playlist> (VCDImager specific terms).  By the default, it is set to a value of "0" which means "play to end of clip".

However, if set to any other value, the playlist will then only play the video clip for that number of seconds.

For example, if <playtime> was set to a value of 60, then the playlist will play the video clip for only 60 seconds rather than playing it to the end of the clip.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that your player understands the <playtime> setting.

Pass with problems: this means that the player understands the <playtime> setting, but it isn't very accurate in it's timing.

Fail: this means that your player doesn't understand this function.  This is relatively common.  On these players, the <playtime> function is ignored completely so it will always play to the end of the video clip.  There is no way around this limitation except to simply not use this function in a dependent way.  Fortunately, this function is fairly uncommonly used.

<autowait> settings moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
<autowait> is an option that can be set in a <playlist> (VCDImager specific terms).

It works in conjunction with the <auto-pause> tags that can be for a <sequence-item>.

Basically, what it does is to pause the playback of the video clip for the amount of time determined by the <autowait> tag at the positions determined by the <auto-pause> tag.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation - Test 1:
Pass: this means that when <auto-pause> settings have been made AND <autowait> has been set to zero, the player correctly ignores the <autowait> tag.

Fail: this means that when <auto-pause> settings have been made, the player does not correctly ignore the <autowait> value of zero.  This means, that even though you don't want the player to pause at the <auto-pause> locations, it will still do so.  This test is not so important as generally, you won't have the situation where you make <auto-pause> settings and then not use them.

Interpretation - Test 2:
Pass: this means that your player correctly paused at the appropriate locations and that it supports the <autowait> setting

Pass with problems: this means that your player understands in part the <autowait> / <auto-pause> tags but it's implementation is not completely correct.  The player may have only recognised ONE of the the <auto-pause> points rather than both and/or, may have paused at the incorrect times (i.e., poor timing).

Fail: this means that your player doesn't understand this function.  This is relatively common.

Overall Summary Interpretation:
Pass: (pass test 1 AND pass test 2) this means that your player fully supports the <autowait> / <auto-pause> tags.   Excellent!

Pass but incomplete support: (passed test two with problems OR passed test two but failed test 1) this means that your player sort of understands <autowait> and <auto-pause> but it's support is somewhat patchy.  As such, it is probably not advised to use this function for your VCDs as the playback may be erratic.  Since this is a fairly uncommon PBC function it is not a great loss.

Fail: (failed test 2) this means that your player doesn't understand this function.  This is relatively common.  Although it is good for a player to support as many of the functions detailed in the VCD specifications as possible, you do not loose much authoring flexibility by the loss of this particular function.

Random function moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
The random function is achieved by author a menu (<selection>) in a particular way.   In particular, you must NOT set a <timeout> reference.  Furthermore, the menu must NOT loop indefinitely (i.e., loop = 0) or wait indefinitely (i.e., wait = -1).

Then, when the menu loads up, after it has finished "looping" and "waiting", it will randomly go to one of the choices if the user has not already selected one.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that your player understands the random function.  This is a very useful feature to have as it cannot be authored any other way.  It allows for a source of "unpredictability" in your VCD projects.

Fail: this means that your player doesn't understand this function.  Unfortunately, for some players the "random" function will cause the player to hang.  Although this isn't a "critical" feature, it is one of the more important non-critical ones.  It is highly recommended that you purchase a player that supports the random function.

<loop> jump timing = immediate critical.jpg (4251 bytes) Importance: critical
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
The <loop> jump timing setting is an option in a <selection> (menus).  It has two settings, "immediate" and "delayed".

IMMEDIATE means that the player will immediately respond to your key press or choice (i.e., if you pressed "next" or (1), etc.).

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that the player supports the setting of "immediate".  Basically, all players support this by default.

Fail: if it fails this test, there is something serious wrong with the player!  Make sure that you conducted the test correctly and if so, this player should not be used for VCD playback in mind.

<loop> jump timing = delayed moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
The <loop> jump timing setting is an option in a <selection> (menus).  It has two settings, "immediate" and "delayed".

DELAYED means that the player will hold your key press or choice in memory (i.e., if you pressed "next" or (1), etc.) but NOT act on it until the current play-item has finished playing (thus, only of importance if you use a video clip as the background of a menu).

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that the player supports the setting of "delayed".  Not all players support this but it is a useful function to have

Fail: the player doesn't not understand the "delayed" setting.  It is reasonably common and usually does not matter.

However, be mindful of the "delayed" option!  For players that don't support this, the "delayed" option will look like it functions the same way as the "immediate" option.  This is especially pertinent for entrypoint chapters as essentially you are using a "menu" for each chapter.  If you accidentally set the timing to "delayed", the keys (i.e., "return", "next" and "prev") will cease to function for people with a player that correctly supports this function!

Thus, for all menus (<selection>), you should set the loop jump timing to "immediate" by default unless you specifically want it as delayed.

Default button mapped? critical.jpg (4251 bytes) Importance: critical
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
The "default" button is one of the possible key presses you can use on a (S)VCD (the others being PREV, NEXT, RETURN, and the numerical buttons (1) to (99) ).

Since there isn't a direct DVD analogue of the "default" button, many DVD remote controls don't have a separate button for it.  Often, it is mapped as the "PLAY" button.

However, there are some players that don't have it at all.   This is a significant oversight.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that the the player has the "default" button mapped on the remote control.  Most players do support it.

Fail: this means that the player doesn't have one of the buttons required for VCDs!  This is very important.   Imagine having a VCR without a "play" button!

Multi-default menus moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
Multi-default menus are an alternate way for menus to work.  To make one, you need:
  1. to make a <selection>
  2. a video clip (<sequence-item>) as the <play-item>,
  3. entrypoints in the <sequence-item>
  4. the same number of choices (i.e., <select> ) as the number of entrypoints
  5. turn on the following setting: <multi-default numeric="enabled">

With a multi-default menu, you can select the different choices by simply pressing the "default" button (often mapped as "PLAY") as different times during the playback of the video clip background.  The idea would be to make the video clip so that it scrolls through the appropriate choices.

Obviously, the "default" button must be mapped on your remote control and player for multi-default menus to function.

As an example, the "main menu" of the PAL/NTSC Demo VCD is a multi-default menu.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that the player supports multi-default menus!  Very handy.

Fail: this means that the player does not support multi-default menus.  Although this is not a critical tests, support for multi-default menus is a very useful ability to have.   Multi-default menus, though more difficult to create, offer a different way of selecting choices on a menu.

Audio only segment play item moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
VCD2.0 allows for the use of audio only MPEG audio (encoded as MPEG-1 Layer 2 audio).

Thus, you can use these to author background audio to menus (for high resolution still images).

One possible use of this is to make an "audio book" type VCD.  It would be possible to fit over 6 hours of near CD quality audio in this manner.

Unfortunately, support for this function is relatively poor among stand-alone players.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: this means that the player supports audio only segment play items properly!  Note: not only must the audio play properly, but the player should continue to display the high resolution still image as well.

Fail: this means that the player does not support this feature.  Although it is a useful feature, as mentioned previously, it is not well supported in stand-alone players.

   

Test Screens

pal still screen | ntsc still screen | pal video clip | ntsc video clip | ntsc-film video clip | tv overscan

PAL still screen moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
This is a high resolution PAL still screen.

Use this screen to see if your equipment can display PAL.

If you are using NTSC equipment, successfully displaying this screen implies either (1) your DVD player is capable of generating an NTSC signal from the PAL source AND/OR you have a multi-system capable TV (i.e., the TV can play both PAL/NTSC).

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: your equipment (player + TV) combination is capable of displaying PAL source images.  If you live in an NTSC area (e.g., North America and Japan), this test implies that you have a good chance of being able to watch PAL video (e.g., international imports) material on your current equipment.

Fail: your equipment (player + TV) combination is incapable of displaying PAL source images.  If you are using NTSC equipment, you may need to read your owner's manual to see if there is an option that you can set. Failure usually means a black and white image with or without a vertical sync problem.

NTSC still screen moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
This is a high resolution NTSC still screen.

Use this screen to see if your equipment can display NTSC.  If you are using PAL equipment, successfully displaying this screen implies either (1) your DVD player is capable of generating a PAL signal from the NTSC source AND/OR you have a multi-system capable TV (i.e., the TV can play both PAL/NTSC).

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: your equipment (player + TV) combination is capable of displaying NTSC source images.  If you live in a PAL/SECAM area (e.g., Europe, Asia, Australia and New Zealand), this test implies that you have a good chance of being able to watch NTSC material (e.g., US and Japanese imports) on your current equipment.

Fail: your equipment (player + TV) combination is incapable of displaying NTSC source images.   If you are using PAL equipment, you may need to read your owner's manual to see if there is an option that you can set.  Failure usually means a black and white image with or without a vertical sync problem.

PAL video clip moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
This is a video clip in PAL settings.

Use this video clip to see if you equipment can correctly and smoothly play PAL video.

If you are using NTSC equipment, successfully playing this video implies either (1) your DVD player is capable of generating an NTSC signal from the PAL source AND/OR you have a multi-system capable TV (i.e., the TV can play both PAL/NTSC).

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: your equipment (player + TV) combination is capable of displaying PAL video.  If your equipment can also play back the NTSC and NTSC-FILM clips correctly, you can use this test to compare relative quality between the standards.

If you are using NTSC equipment, take notice of any abnormalities with the picture (compare it to the NTSC clip).    Some players affect the aspect ratio of the picture or crop part of the picture during the conversion to NTSC.

Fail: your equipment (player + TV) combination is incapable of correctly playing PAL source video.  Some NTSC players may display PAL still images fine, but have jerky playback for video.   This is poor quality PAL to NTSC conversion.

NTSC video clip moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
This is a video clip in NTSC settings.

Use this video clip to see if you equipment can correctly and smoothly play NTSC video.

If you are using PAL equipment, successfully playing this video implies either (1) your DVD player is capable of generating a PAL signal from the NTSC source AND/OR you have a multi-system capable TV (i.e., the TV can play both PAL/NTSC).

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: your equipment (player + TV) combination is capable of displaying NTSC video.  If your equipment can also play back the PAL and NTSC-FILM clips correctly, you can use this test to compare relative quality between the standards.

If you are using PAL equipment, take notice of any abnormalities with the picture (compare it to the PAL clip).    Some players affect the aspect ratio of the picture or crop part of the picture during the conversion to PAL.

Fail: your equipment (player + TV) combination is incapable of correctly playing NTSC source video.  Some PAL players may display NTSC still images fine, but have jerky playback for video.   This is poor quality NTSC to PAL conversion.

NTSC-FILM video clip moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
This is a video clip in NTSC-FILM settings.

Use this video clip to see if you equipment can correctly and smoothly play NTSC-FILM video.   NTSC-FILM settings for VCDs give a relative bitrate benefit over standard PAL and NTSC of about 25%  Thus, for NTSC-FILM source material (e.g., many NTSC DVDs), encoding to an NTSC-FILM VCD can give substantial quality benefits.

However, not all equipment can correctly and smoothly playback NTSC-FILM VCDs.

For NTSC equipment, the player will have to be able to perform on-the-fly 3:2 pulldown.

For PAL equipment, the player will have to be able to convert the video to PAL (or alternatively, the player does 3:2 pulldown to standard NTSC and you have a multi-system capable TV).

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: your equipment (player + TV) combination is capable of displaying NTSC-FILM video.  Excellent!

Fail: your equipment (player + TV) combination is incapable of correctly playing NTSC-FILM source video.

TV Overscan moderate.jpg (4317 bytes) Importance: moderate
bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
On almost all TVs, there is part of the picture are the edges that is not visible and is cropped.  How much of the screen is lost to TV overscan primarily depends on the TV (though the DVD player can make a small difference).

Thus, use this screen to measure the degree of picture loss.  The best screens have small amounts of TV overscan and importantly, symmetrical on all 4 sides.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
The average amount of TV overscan is in the order of about 5%  Try to avoid TV sets that have a large TV overscan or where there is a definite asymmetry to the loss.
   

XVCD test clips

xvcd 1 | xvcd 2 | xvcd 3 | xvcd 4 | xvcd 5

XVCD clip 1

352 x 240/288
1500 kbit/s CBR

bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
Note
: XVCDs are not part of any standard and should not be expected to work on any particular player

This simple clip is almost the same as standard VCD except for the fact that the bitrate is higher than normal (CBR = constant bitrate @ 1500 kbit/s).  This clip is used to test whether your player can handle non-standard streams at all.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: your player can play non-standard streams!  With this established, we can test some more specific features.  You can assume that your player can also play any XVCD clip that uses CBR MPEG-1 with a maximum bitrate of less than 1500 kbit/s (i.e., including low-bitrate XVCDs)

Fail: your player does not appear to be able to play non-standard streams!  It is very unlikely that it will successfully play any of the other XVCD test clips.

XVCD clip 2

352 x 240/288
1150 kbit/s avg. VBR
500 min., 1500 max.

bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
Note
: XVCDs are not part of any standard and should not be expected to work on any particular player

This clip follows on from the previous test.   Test one (if successful) tells you that the player can playback a clip at a constant bitrate of 1500 kbit/s.  This clip does not exceed the maximum.   However, it instead uses VBR (variable bitrate) encoding.

This clip tests whether your player can handle VBR MPEG-1 streams.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: your player can play variable bitrate non-standard streams!  This is useful to know.  VBR encoding offers much more flexibility to the encoder as it can spare bits from easy to encode sections of the video to boost the bitrate on the difficult to encode parts.  Overall, the average bitrate may be the same as a similar constant bitrate clip, but VBR can yield superior quality.

Fail: your player does not appear to be able to handle variable bitrate MPEG-1 streams.  If you intend on making XVCDs to play on this player, you may have to stick to CBR encoding.

XVCD clip 3

480 x 480/576
2000 kbit/s avg. VBR
500 min., 2500 max.

bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
Note
: XVCDs are not part of any standard and should not be expected to work on any particular player

This clip follows on from the previous tests.  It also uses VBR encoding but significantly uses a high framesize (480 x 480/576).

This clips tests whether your player can handle an MPEG-1 clip that is still restrained by SVCD parameters (i.e., framesize of 480 x 480/576 and a maximum bitrate of less than 2500 kbit/s for video).

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: your player is able to handle XVCD MPEG-1 parameters up to SVCD specifications!  This is really quite excellent.   You can get some high quality encodings with these specifications.  Some people make such discs as opposed to standard SVCDs because their players do not support SVCD.

Fail: your player does not appear to be able to handle this.  It may be because of the framesize (480 x 480/576) or the higher bitrate (maximum of 2500 kbit/s).  If you could play XVCD clip 2 correctly, then you can experiment with video clips of specifications between the two.

XVCD clip 4

704 x 480/576
3000 kbit/s avg. VBR
500 min., 4000 max.

bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
Note
: XVCDs are not part of any standard and should not be expected to work on any particular player

This clip follows on from the previous tests.  It uses a large framesize (704 x 480/576 -- equivalent to high resolution still images) and high bitrate.

This clips tests whether your player can handle an MPEG-1 clip that contains both a high framesize and high bitrate.  The maximum bitrate of this clip is over 3x that allowed for VCDs.  By encoding at such settings, you can achieve near-DVD quality.  However, compatibility for such high-specification XVCDs is much lower.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: your player is able to handle XVCD MPEG-1 of these parameters!  Outstanding!  Although such a high bitrate will limit the amount of video you can fit on a disc, you will be able to achieve very high quality results indeed.  Depending on your source, you can easily get near-DVD quality video at these settings.

Fail: your player does not appear to be able to handle this.  This may be because of the frame size or the higher bitrate.  If you could play XVCD clip 3 correctly, then you can experiment with video clips of specifications between the two.  Generally, the larger the framesize and the higher the bitrate, the less compatible the XVCD will be.

XVCD clip 5

704 x 480/576
6000 kbit/s CBR

bulb.jpg (3874 bytes) What does it do?
Note
: XVCDs are not part of any standard and should not be expected to work on any particular player

This clip follows on from the previous tests.  It uses a very high bitrate of 6000 kbit/s.  Although DVD bitrates are higher, single spin DVD drives are not designed to read CDs are much more than 3-spin CD.   If so, they usually "spin up" to improve CD reading performance.

This clip basically tests whether your player has a drive mechanism that can handle such a sustained high bitrate.

interpret.jpg (4000 bytes) Interpretation:
Pass: your player is able to handle XVCD MPEG-1 with extremely high sustained bitrates.  This is amazing indeed.  There are relatively few players that contain a drive that can read at such a high sustained bitrate.

Fail: your player does not appear to be able to handle this.  This suggests that the drive cannot read the disc at such a high rate.  If you could play XVCD clip 4 correctly, then experiment with a maximum bitrate between the two.

 


Michael Tam <vitualis (at) michaeltam.com>
anti-spam device - replace (at) with @ to send me e-mail

(c) 27 December, 2002